Absurd and Paradox in Christianity

Sunday. The day of the light. The first and the eighth day of the week – a great mystery, how can the same day be double? How can God be three persons? Sunday: the making and the re-making of the world.

Sunday is prayer time. Prayer is conversation with God. We are poorer and drier when we do not pray. The energy stops flowing, no matter how much we’d jog along the streets. Sunday is the time to grow vertical and expand infinitely.

On Sundays, I shall post quotes which I endeavour to keep translating from a diary written by a Romanian Jew intellectual who was incarcerated in communist prisons and became not only an Orthodox Christian, but also a monk. I promise you Fr. Nicolae Steinhardt is one of a kind. His writings on God and Christianity are wonderfully to the point, many times too complex in their Romanian spirit to be able to achieve an accurate translation. I shall try my best. Here is one tiny sample.

“28 August 1964

Nobody becomes a Christian, even if they receive the baptism, like I did, late in life. I think it is no different in phenomenal conversions. The calling is always from before – no matter how deeply, subtly, cleverly masked. Pascal: Tu ne me chercherais point[1] The logic is always turned upside down: you’re looking for what you’ve found, you find what has been prepared for you, what you’ve already been given.

I am drawing two conclusions:

First, the true rudiments of the Christian doctrine: the absurd and the paradox. Second, God works in detail and with skill, when it rewards as well as when it punishes. Those – not always stupid – who believe that they can trick God, that they can deceive Him are bitterly wrong. No way. He gives a gift or a beating with accurate sophistication – which shows that God is not only good, right, almighty etc, He is also incredibly smart.”

[1] Blaise Pascal, Le Mystère de Jésus: “Tu ne me chercherais pas si tu ne m’avais trouvé. (Pensées, 553 [éd. Brunschvicg])

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